Traditional recipes

Seared Scallops with Brown Butter and Chive Sauce

Seared Scallops with Brown Butter and Chive Sauce

Season one side of each of the scallops with salt and pepper. Heat the oil in a very large nonstick skillet over medium-high heat until it is very hot but not smoking. Add the scallops, seasoned-side down, and season their tops with salt and pepper. So they develop that all-important seared surface, cook the scallops without moving them until the underside is well browned, about 5 minutes.

Flip the scallops over. Add 2 tablespoons of the butter to the skillet. When it melts, constantly spoon the butter over the scallops, letting them turn a deeper shade of brown, about 1 minute. Transfer them to a platter.

Reduce the heat to medium. Stir in the wine and bring it to a boil. Remove from the heat. Add the remaining 1 tablespoon butter, the chives, and lemon juice, and stir well. Pour the sauce over the scallops and serve them immediately.


Seared scallops with ponzu, ginger and chives

There had been flirtation. Rounds of spiky conversation. But the direction of this dalliance was still hovering in the air.

Then we met for rendezvous No. 3.

The evening started out promisingly: a biblical storm unleashed outside, a table in front of a lively fire, a nice bottle of Petite Sirah to arrive presently.

And then I eyed his potatoes.

In response, my companion’s eyes fell to his fresh white shirt. Then, his lap. “What?” His gaze finally settled on his plate -- a compliments-of-the-chef starter that the waiter had just placed before him. He focused back on me, eyebrows raised, perplexed: “What?”

I didn’t answer immediately. Not to be coy. I was taking it all in. The potatoes -- golden, crispy wedges -- were studded with thick chunks of apple-wood-smoked bacon. All of it glistening with butter. But that’s not what had gotten my attention.

“The chives, " I said. There they were, their slender, bright, deep green stalks strewn about, playing peekaboo. Flirting more overtly than my companion.

“Oh. You like chives?” he said as if I’d finally given him the key to something. A smile bloomed and then something different -- something new -- flickered in his eyes: “I should find out if they have more in the kitchen. Put them on everything you order. ”

I matched his gaze, surprised somewhat by my own candor, this different spark. And now, as we eyed the chives, even if they served as a convenient stand-in, they were a clue, an indicator, of an open door. I knew that finally everything was on the table.

I couldn’t go as far to say that chives have the magic of an aphrodisiac -- my personal oyster, aniseed or taste of semisweet dark chocolate. But in all their inscrutable delicateness, chives summon up something strong inside me.

Not as brazen as garlic or onions, chives are sometimes taken for granted. I think this every time I see them toted out in some version of a stainless steel gravy boat by a sullen server and heaped upon a baked potato, by rote, as if to resuscitate.

But it was under similar circumstances that I first connected with chives as a child. A glum waiter plopped them down in a ramekin, reporting that the kitchen had run out of sour cream. I accepted my potato with a pat of butter and salt and liberally sprinkled the lot with chives: The flavor that burst through -- subtle, sharp and warm -- was as complex as it was restrained.

There are very few things I keep in my refrigerator on a regular basis. Certainly, very few things that will perish quickly.

My day always spools out into the late evening. My meals are often caught on the fly -- with friends at restaurants, hunted and gathered from after-party tables.

On any given day, a peek inside my fridge would reveal little more than some domestic bottled water, imported condiments (Thai chili sauce, tarragon mustard), coffee beans and a carton of eggs. Perhaps some cheese -- feta or manchego.

But no matter how top-to-bottom a week I think I’m going to have, how seldom I figure I’ll have the time or energy to stand in front of the stove, I always make sure I have fresh chives stowed away just in case. Just in case a dreamy night of live music calls for a late-night omelet with goat cheese and chives to prolong the conversation.

Just in case friends arrive and I can slide a salmon filet on the grill or toss a few scallops into the skillet and just add ginger, ponzu and a shower of fresh chives. On nesting days, I might snip chives over simple soups -- hot or cold -- to suss out another layer: a simple chicken broth with lemon and chives a childhood tomato soup with a dollop of creme fraiche and chives. As a thank-you for a couch to crash on last August, a friend whipped up a chilled summer melon gazpacho punctuated with that inscrutable, singular note.

I go through cilantro and sweet basil benders, but I always circle back. There might be fancier, flashier, trendier aromatics -- herbes de Provence, fennel, lemon verbena, arugula or lavender -- but the beauty of chives is that they simply don’t need to be the center of attention. And they are certainly not flavor of the month. They work best to support other flavors, to bolster, and, with a few snips, make the mundane marvelous.

Chive oil is handy for that too. Just simmer chopped chives in canola oil, puree, strain and you’ll have a bottle on hand of liquid chives to give a quick slash of color and intense flavor to mashed potatoes or steamed fish or grilled chicken breast.

To reveal what magic those chives worked (or didn’t) that rainy evening would be indelicate -- decidedly un-chive like. But the plates arrived, the middle courses, main courses. And mysteriously, even without my shy companion’s assist, the chives also continued to arrive, dropped like confetti over scallops, tying up puff pastry stuffed with wild mushrooms and chestnuts so the dish looked like an early Christmas gift.

I took it as a gentle sign of promise. Like the rain, the fire and the music that night the chives didn’t obstruct or overpower what they had been brought in to adorn. They just emboldened what was already there.


Preparation

Step 1

Cut 2 lemons in half and squeeze juice into a measuring glass or small bowl you should have ¼ cup juice. Set aside. Using a paring knife, cut ends off remaining lemon to expose flesh. Upend lemon on a cut end and remove peel and white pith from lemons discard. Cut between membranes to release segments into bowl with juice squeeze membranes to get any last drops of juice. Fish out any seeds set aside. Thinly slice chives and place in a small bowl set aside.

Step 2

Pull side muscle off scallops, if needed pat dry. Season lightly on both sides with salt and pepper. Heat a large skillet, preferably stainless steel, over medium-high. Pour in oil to lightly coat surface (2–3 Tbsp.) heat until it shimmers and you see first wisps of smoke. Swiftly place scallops into skillet, flat side down, and cook without touching, tossing, or fussing until underside is deep golden brown, 3–4 minutes. Use a thin spatula or tongs to gently turn over if they resist, cook another 30 seconds and try again. Cook on second side until flesh at top and bottom looks opaque but there is still a faintly translucent strip in the middle, 1–2 minutes, depending on size. Transfer scallops to a plate.

Step 3

Pour off any oil in skillet and set over medium heat. Add butter and cook, swirling, until butter foams, then browns, about 2 minutes. Add reserved lemon juice and segments energetically stir and swirl pan to emulsify sauce. Mix in capers and reserved chives and spoon pan sauce around and over scallops.


If you love seafood, then you will absolutely love this pan-seared sea scallops recipe that cooks in under 5 minutes.

Scallops are bivalve mollusk that is a muscle that is encapsulated into two shells. It’s in the same family as a mussel, clam, or oyster. Scallops are most commonly sold shucked with the foot attached. The foot is what attaches the scallop to the shell, and I advise removing it because it can be chewy once cooked.

Ingredients for this recipe:

• 8 ounces softened unsalted butter + 2 tablespoons
• ½ peeled and finely minced shallot
• 2 finely minced cloves of garlic
• 2 tablespoons chopped fresh chives
• 2 tablespoons chopped fresh thyme
• ¼ cup chopped fresh parsley
• juice and zest of 1 lemon
• 1 pound U12 sea scallops, foot removed
• 2 tablespoons oil
• 1/3 cup white wine
• sea salt and fresh cracked pepper to taste

1. In a stand mixer with the paddle attachment whip together the 2 sticks of butter for 4-6 minutes on medium to high speed until it is light and fluffy.
2. Next, add in the lemon juice and mix until combined, about 1 minute.
3. Add in the garlic, shallot, lemon juice, parsley, thyme, chives, and salt and pepper until completely combined. Chill.
4. Remove the foot of the scallops, pat dry with paper towels, and season the scallops on both sides with salt and pepper.
5. Heat 2 tablespoons of oil in a sauté pan over high heat until it begins to lightly smoke. Add in the scallops quickly and turn the heat down to medium-high.
6. Immediately add in the 2 tablespoons of unsalted butter to help brown and season the scallops
7. Turn the scallops over after 1:30 to 2 minutes or until golden brown on the bottom.
8. Cook the scallops for a further 30 to 45 seconds or until the desired internal temperature is achieved.
9. Remove the scallops and deglaze with the white wine and cook until it is almost gone over medium heat, about 2 to 3 minutes.
10. Remove the pan from the burner and add in 1/4 cup of the herb butter and whisk until melted. Reserve the remaining in the freezer for a later date!

Make-Ahead: Scallops are meant to be eaten as soon as they are finished cooking.

How to Reheat: Re-sear the scallops in the exact same method but cut the cooking times in half as to not overcook. You can also reheat in the microwave.

How to Store: Cover and keep in the refrigerator for up to 3 days. These will not freeze well, and I would recommend freezing un-cooked.

Scallops are meant to be eaten at a more medium-internal temperature.

They will overcook very quickly and become very chewy.

If you have the option always buy dry-packed scallops.

Also, try serving the scallops with a simple beurre blanc.

There will be plenty of herb compound butter leftover that is perfect for freezing.

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If you love seafood, then you will absolutely love this pan-seared sea scallops recipe that cooks in under 5 minutes.

Scallops are bivalve mollusk that is a muscle that is encapsulated into two shells. It’s in the same family as a mussel, clam, or oyster. Scallops are most commonly sold shucked with the foot attached. The foot is what attaches the scallop to the shell, and I advise removing it because it can be chewy once cooked.

Ingredients for this recipe:

• 8 ounces softened unsalted butter + 2 tablespoons
• ½ peeled and finely minced shallot
• 2 finely minced cloves of garlic
• 2 tablespoons chopped fresh chives
• 2 tablespoons chopped fresh thyme
• ¼ cup chopped fresh parsley
• juice and zest of 1 lemon
• 1 pound U12 sea scallops, foot removed
• 2 tablespoons oil
• 1/3 cup white wine
• sea salt and fresh cracked pepper to taste

1. In a stand mixer with the paddle attachment whip together the 2 sticks of butter for 4-6 minutes on medium to high speed until it is light and fluffy.
2. Next, add in the lemon juice and mix until combined, about 1 minute.
3. Add in the garlic, shallot, lemon juice, parsley, thyme, chives, and salt and pepper until completely combined. Chill.
4. Remove the foot of the scallops, pat dry with paper towels, and season the scallops on both sides with salt and pepper.
5. Heat 2 tablespoons of oil in a sauté pan over high heat until it begins to lightly smoke. Add in the scallops quickly and turn the heat down to medium-high.
6. Immediately add in the 2 tablespoons of unsalted butter to help brown and season the scallops
7. Turn the scallops over after 1:30 to 2 minutes or until golden brown on the bottom.
8. Cook the scallops for a further 30 to 45 seconds or until the desired internal temperature is achieved.
9. Remove the scallops and deglaze with the white wine and cook until it is almost gone over medium heat, about 2 to 3 minutes.
10. Remove the pan from the burner and add in 1/4 cup of the herb butter and whisk until melted. Reserve the remaining in the freezer for a later date!

Make-Ahead: Scallops are meant to be eaten as soon as they are finished cooking.

How to Reheat: Re-sear the scallops in the exact same method but cut the cooking times in half as to not overcook. You can also reheat in the microwave.

How to Store: Cover and keep in the refrigerator for up to 3 days. These will not freeze well, and I would recommend freezing un-cooked.

Scallops are meant to be eaten at a more medium-internal temperature.

They will overcook very quickly and become very chewy.

If you have the option always buy dry-packed scallops.

Also, try serving the scallops with a simple beurre blanc.

There will be plenty of herb compound butter leftover that is perfect for freezing.


Seared Scallops with Roasted Corn and Chive Butter

Seared Scallops with Roasted Corn and Chive Butter gives me all the Valentine’s Day dinner feels right now. When I want to do something special or romantic, scallops always comes to mind. It’s something that you don’t normally make at home, but it’s fancy and impressive.

This rich butter sauce made up of chives, garlic and smoky paprika. Roasted corn and quick cooking polenta is an easy side. I’m not joking when I say this is a 15 minute meal that’s delicious and so impressive for a special occasion.

When searing scallops there’s a few key things that are important for the perfect sear. One: make sure that when buying scallops they are dry packed not packed in water. When cooking they will expel the water making them soggy. Two: always, always pat them completely dry with a paper towel. And three: high heat, high heat in a cast iron skillet or heavy bottomed all clad. Those three things will be the key to successful perfectly seared scallops.

Scallops cook in minutes flat. Over cooking scallops will cause them to be rubbery. Nobody likes to eat rubber scallops. Think of it as a medium rare steak, you want the same concept when cooking all seafood. It should have a golden crust on the outside and tender on the inside.

Serve over a bed of cheesy polenta for a delicious meal.

Wine Pairing Recommendation: A Pinot Blanc is my perfect pairing with this dish. It’s crisp, dry and has balanced acidity that will pair beautifully with this savory smoky dish.


Cook the Scallops

Pat the scallops dry with paper towels and season them with the salt and pepper.

Coat the bottom of 2 large skillets with clarified butter (see recipe to make it below). Place the pans over a medium-high flame and heat until the butter is nearly smoking.

Divide the scallops between the pans do not shake the pans or move the scallops around. Immediately reduce the heat to medium and add a little more clarified butter to each pan.

Cook the scallops until they are deeply brown on one side, about 3 minutes.

Turn the scallops over, and add a sprig of thyme and a clove of garlic to each pan. Allow the scallops to brown slightly on the other side, continuously basting them with the hot butter, about 2 minutes.

Transfer the scallops to a platter with a slotted spoon and reserve in a warm place.

Add the 1 tablespoon of butter to the pan and scrape with a wooden spoon to dislodge any browned bits remove the pan from the heat when the butter is completely melted.

Pour an equal portion of the emulsion onto each plate in a wide stripe down the center.

Place an equal portion of scallops, browned side up, in the center of each plate, spoon the pan drippings around, and serve immediately.


Low Carb Keto Pan Seared Scallops with Browned Butter Sauce and Fresh Herbs

This is a low carb dish of scallops with herb butter sauce. It’s a great entree with only 3g net carbs.

  • Author:Resolution Eats
  • Prep Time: 15
  • Cook Time: 15
  • Total Time: 30 minutes
  • Yield: 4 servings 1 x
  • Category: Entree
  • Cuisine: Amercian

Ingredients

  • 1 1/2 pounds scallops, tendons removed
  • 1 quart water
  • 1/4 cup fresh lemon juice
  • 2 tablespoons salt
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil, divided
  • 6 tablespoons unsalted butter, divided
  • 1 tablespoon fresh parsley, chopped
  • 1 teaspoon fresh chives, chopped
  • salt and pepper
  • lemon wedges

Instructions

1. If the scallops are “dry” and not packed in an STP and salt water solution, then move on to step 2. If they are “wet” scallops, then brine them in a mixture of 1 quart water, 2 tablespoons salt and 1/4 cup fresh lemon juice for 30 minutes.

2. Place scallops on a rimmed baking sheet lined with clean dish towel. Place second clean dish towel on top of scallops and press gently on towel to blot liquid. Let scallops sit on the counter for 10 minutes while towels absorb moisture.

3. Sprinkle scallops on both sides with salt and pepper. Heat 1 tablespoon olive oil in 12-inch nonstick skillet over high heat until just smoking. Add half of scallops in single layer, flat side down, and cook, without moving them, until well browned, 1 1/2 to 2 minutes.

4. Add 1 tablespoon butter to skillet. Using tongs, flip scallops continue to cook, using large spoon to baste scallops with melted butter (tilt skillet so butter runs to 1 side) until sides of scallops are firm and centers are opaque and register 115 degrees, 30 to 90 seconds longer (remove smaller scallops as they finish cooking). Transfer scallops to large plate and tent loosely with aluminum foil. Wipe out skillet with paper towels and repeat with remaining scallops, 1 tablespoon olive oil and 1 tablespoon butter. Keep them tented under tin foil as you make the butter sauce.

5. Use a small egg pan for the browned butter sauce. It’s good to use a light colored pan so you can easily gauge the color of the sauce. Add remaining 1/4 cup butter to the pan and cook over medium heat. Let the butter melt and cook, stirring often, until it’s nutty and browned, 4 to 6 minutes.

6. Pour the browned butter sauce over the scallops and sprinkle fresh parsley and chives on top. Serve with lemon wedges.


Lemon Chive Butter Seared Scallops with Parmesan Risotto

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Nothing says super fancy snazzy like risotto and scallops. Your house will smell amazing, and you’ll feel like an absolute super star. Lemon chive butter seared scallops with parmesan risotto for the win!

I’m usually all about the zippy, quick meals with as little hands-on cooking as possible, but risotto? It’s SO worth the time and effort. Straight up, I don’t believe in risotto cheats. Baked risotto, 10 minute risotto, no stir risotto. Nooooope. I’m sure those versions taste absolutely delectable, but it ain’t risotto .

In order for risotto to be risotto, it needs to have a super creamy, AH-mazing texture that legit only comes from constant “smash” stirring as I like to call it, and adding the broth warmed up and only a half cup at a time. Then some more smash stirring. Aaaaand repeat for 20 minutes or more. But like I said, SO worth it.

Plus, once you’ve plated some lemon chive butter seared scallops with parmesan risotto, you’re going to feel like a Parisian chef snagging a Michelin Star . ‍. Seriously, the fancy feel is real .

Now about those scallops real quick. The number one tip is to make sure to pat them dry, as dry as absolutely possible. The drier the better. Also, gently shake the pan around a lot to keep the scallops from sticking and tearing.

I actually made this dish for the hubby last Friday when he’d been out of town all week and I felt like an absolute super star. Looking for a date night recipe? Lemon chive butter seared scallops with parmesan risotto has you covered .


Seared Scallops With Citrus Butter

Turn the heat down to medium and add 2 tablespoons of butter, scraping up any browned bits. Add the shallots and cook until softened, 1-2 minutes.

Add the wine (or broth) and bring to a simmer for 2 minutes or until reduced by about half. Stir in the remaining tablespoon of butter, Darling Clementine® juice and Darling Lemon® juice. Cook for another 1-2 minutes until sauce has thickened slightly. Season to taste with salt and pepper stir in parsley.


Tips for Buying Scallops

  • Look for Dry Scallops - I get dry scallops when I can that are U/10 or U/12 (meaning about 10 or 12 per pound). They are nice sized scallops. I prefer the dry ones because they contain no preservatives so they do not produce much water when cooking them. This allows for a nice seared crust.
  • Choosing Fresh Scallops- They should be firm to the touch, not have a fishy smell and be a beige to creamy white color.
  • Buy Scallops when on sale - The downside is that dry scallops are more expensive however the extra money is worth every penny. But they do go on sale so that is when I buy them.

Check out the Fulton Fish Market Guide to Scallops for more about scallops.


Seared Scallops with Brown Butter & Lemon Pan Sauce

Featured by Ballentine Vineyard in the Gold Wine Club.

Description

Fresh lemon-seared scallops with capers is a perfect match for the recent White Blend from your Gold Wine Club shipment.

Yield: 4
Prep Time: 10 Minutes
Cook Time: 6 Minutes

Ingredients

• 3 lemons
• Small handful of chives
• 12 large dry sea scallops
• Kosher salt, freshly ground pepper
• Extra-virgin olive oil or vegetable oil
• 3 Tbs unsalted butter, cut into pieces
• 2 tsp drained capers

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Instructions

Cut two lemons in half and squeeze the juice into a measuring glass or small bowl you should have 1/4 cup juice. Set aside. Using a paring knife, cut ends off remaining lemon to expose flesh. Upend lemon on a cut end and remove peel and white pith from lemons discard. Cut between membranes to release segments into bowl with juice squeeze membranes to get any last drops of juice. Fish out any seeds set aside. Thinly slice chives and place in a small bowl set aside.

Pull side muscle off scallops, if needed pat dry. Season lightly on both sides with salt and pepper. Heat a large skillet, preferably stainless steel, over medium-high heat. Pour in oil to lightly coat surface (2-3 Tbs) heat until it shimmers and you see first wisps of smoke. Swiftly place scallops into skillet, flat side down, and cook without touching, tossing or fussing until underside is deep golden brown, 3-4 minutes. Use a thin spatula or tongs to gently turn over if they resist, cook another 30 seconds and try again. Cook on second side until flesh at top and bottom looks opaque but there is still a faintly translucent strip in the middle, 1-2 minutes, depending on size. Transfer scallops to a plate.

Pour off any oil in skillet and set over medium heat. Add butter and cook, swirling, until butter foams, then browns, about 2 minutes. Add reserved lemon juice and segments energetically stir and swirl pan to emulsify sauce. Mix in capers and reserved chives and spoon pan sauce around and over scallops.

Recipe sourced from www.BonAppetit.com.

Listed below is an array of superb, medal-winning wines from our six exceptional Wine Clubs. Since 1992, we have been including recipes in our Gold Wine Club shipments for our members to enjoy with their selected wines. Take a look below and discover the perfect wine pairing for the recipe featured above!